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Do You Smell That?

  • The Casual Pint Hardin Valley 10677 Hardin Valley Road Knoxville, TN, 37931 United States

Join us tonight as we hear from University of Tennessee scientists as they discuss science that will tickle your senses.

Timeline

6:30pm

Doors will be open at 6:30pm. There are numerous excellent food options in the Hardin Valley area so be sure to plan ahead and bring some tasty eats! Enjoy a bounty of drinks (both with and without alcohol) offered by the Casual Pint while chatting with new friends.

7:00-9:00pm

Following a brief introduction to taste of science and thanks to our sponsors, we will hear from our speakers with plenty of time between for questions and refills. 

FAQ

Seating is limited; only a limited number of tickets will be available for purchase at the door. 

Curtis Luckett, Director of the Sensory Science and Innovation Center and Assistant Professor of Food Science at the University of Tennessee. 

Curtis Luckett, Director of the Sensory Science and Innovation Center and Assistant Professor of Food Science at the University of Tennessee. 

When the Brain Overrules the Tongue

In our everyday life, we are constantly perceiving sensory inputs from multiple different sources. For example, when we sit down for a meal we are constantly inundated with sights, sounds, smells, and tastes that create our eating experience. However, inputs from one modality influence the perception in another. For example, dying sugar water red increases the sweet taste perception or music volume can alter your perception of alcohol.

 

Ralph Laurel, Matt Kubis & Katherine Krouse: Representing the UT Knoxville iGEM Team

Ralph Laurel, Matt Kubis & Katherine Krouse: Representing the UT Knoxville iGEM Team

Engineering E. Coli to Convert Toxic Pollutants into Aromatic Aldehydes

Crude oil processing produces toxic byproducts, such as benzene, toluene, and xylene. These harmful byproducts can contaminate the groundwater and soil. However, by engineering E. Coli with the TOL pathway in P. putida, we can convert these byproducts into aromatic aldehydes, which are used in the fragrance and pharmaceutical industries.