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taste of science presents: Bones

  • Ryan's Daughter 350 E. 85th St. New York New York (map)

Join us Tuesday, October 3rd as we take a hard look at human anatomy in our special event on bones. Kris Sunderic (CCNY) will explain his work on bone regeneration and how his findings are being applied to bioengineering. Tim Bromage (NYU) will discuss how lasers and mineralized hard tissues, like bones and teeth, are helping his team answer critical questions on evolution and the environment. Also on deck is a hands-on opportunity to study the diet of an owl by dissecting out the bones in an owl pellet. As always, you can enjoy these great talks with a beverage in hand (maybe keep your drinks away from the owl pellets). We recommend a White Russian if you feel the need for some calcium!

First talk starts at 7:15pm. Ryan's Daughter does not serve food, but feel free to order to the bar or bring your own!

Image credit: Jacob Medina

Kris Sunderic (CCNY): Enhancing Bone-forming Activity in Adult Stem Cells Using Periodic Heating and Ultrasound Stimulation Bone tissue can repair itself when injured, but slow tissue growth and high failure rates necessitate better interventions for bone repair and regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a promising new approach to repair bone defects resulting from disease, infection, tumors, acute trauma, or poorly-healing fractures. In this talk, I'll discuss my laboratory's latest developments in facilitating bone growth from adult stem cells, and the therapeutic applications.

Kris Sunderic (CCNY): Enhancing Bone-forming Activity in Adult Stem Cells Using Periodic Heating and Ultrasound Stimulation

Bone tissue can repair itself when injured, but slow tissue growth and high failure rates necessitate better interventions for bone repair and regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a promising new approach to repair bone defects resulting from disease, infection, tumors, acute trauma, or poorly-healing fractures. In this talk, I'll discuss my laboratory's latest developments in facilitating bone growth from adult stem cells, and the therapeutic applications.

Tim Bromage (NYU): Abandoning Hypotheses Enables Progress In Research On How Stuff Works If complexity science has taught us anything, it is that discovery-based research will uncover significant, important, and surprising knowledge that no hypothesis could ever have predicted. In this presentation I will explore how removing the blinders in research have taken us on a non-linear journey that begins with bone and tooth microanatomy, that continue with the study of metabolic ecology, and lately concern what happened when I peed in a cup and drowned my sorrows in bottled water.

Tim Bromage (NYU): Abandoning Hypotheses Enables Progress In Research On How Stuff Works

If complexity science has taught us anything, it is that discovery-based research will uncover significant, important, and surprising knowledge that no hypothesis could ever have predicted. In this presentation I will explore how removing the blinders in research have taken us on a non-linear journey that begins with bone and tooth microanatomy, that continue with the study of metabolic ecology, and lately concern what happened when I peed in a cup and drowned my sorrows in bottled water.

Earlier Event: June 6
Taste of Science presents: Whales