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San Francisco: Neuroscience & Storytelling
Apr
23
4:00 pm16:00

San Francisco: Neuroscience & Storytelling

  • Laughing Monk Brewery

Why do we love stories? Matthew Luhn and Sarah Hillenbrand, experts in storytelling and neuroscience, will explain why and how our brains respond to stories at The Laughing Monk Brewery.

Stories Your Brain Tells

Sarah Hillenbrand

Lecturer in the Thinking Matters Program, Stanford University

Your life story: How would you tell it?  Every second of every day our brains are putting together information from the moments of our lives to form a coherent narrative.  But what happens when your brain needs to fill in the gaps?   We'll look at how the brain creates meaning from raw data, and how stories help.

The Science of Story

Matthew Luhn

Writer, Story Consultant and Keynote Speaker, Original Story Creators at Pixar

Have you ever wondered why storytelling is the # 1 skill to connect, motivate, lead, and entertain people in today's world? It all comes down to science! Join Matthew Luhn, 20 year Pixar story veteran, as he shares the science behind why we cry and laugh when we watch, read, and experience great stories.

Palo Alto: Life on Earth and Beyond
Apr
24
7:00 pm19:00

Palo Alto: Life on Earth and Beyond

  • THE PATIO

Krish Seetah will tell us how lessons from history can help us combat disease outbreaks in future followed by a tour of the universe with Jessie Dotson.

Food and drinks available for purchase.

21+ event

Can archaeology and history help to build better predictive models for future disease?

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Krish Seetah

Assistant professor at Stanford University, Department of Anthropology

Malaria and other vector-borne diseases have been a scourge for millennia. With a warming climate and increased mobility, the global community face a challenge in terms of predicting and dealing with future outbreaks. This talk offers an alternative view, using multiple datasets to illustrate how we might better understand malaria, and human response to the disease, based on historic epidemics.

A tour of the universe as seen by NASA’s K2 Mission

Jessie Dotson

Kepler2 Project Scientist at NASA Ames

NASA launched the Kepler space telescope in 2009 to search for exoplanets. Kepler monitored 170,000 stars for 4 years seeking the telltale dimming of a transiting planet. After losing a second reaction wheel in 2013, the spacecraft began its K2 mission, pointing in the ecliptic where the solar pressure stays on the spacecraft axis of symmetry. Observing along the ecliptic allows us to study a wide variety of objects including exoplanets, asteroids, white dwarfs and supernova (just to name a few).

San Francisco: Space Exploration
Apr
24
7:30 pm19:30

San Francisco: Space Exploration

  • PianoFight

Join Taste of Science at PianoFight for a night focused on space! Marcia Fiamengo a NASA Ambassador and Virgin Galactic Future Astronaut will speak about the importance of space exploration. Miguel Ramahlo-Santos, an associate professor at UCSF, will explain what he has learned from stem cells to open the possibility of suspended animation. Following the talks, we will have Science Trivia at the bar hosted by the Stanford Complexity club!

Ticket will be available soon.

Changing the world and saving the planet; one space mission at a time

Marcia Fiamengo

Solar System Ambassador - NASA JPL-Caltech Solar System Ambassador - Virgin Galactic Future Astronaut

Humans look up and out for peace and perspective, but looking down and inward from space may be our only hope.

Learning from stem cells how to pause life

Miguel Ramalho-Santos

Associate Professor, Principal Investigator - UCSF

Embryonic stem cells and embryos are known to grow very rapidly. But we have found that they can also be put on hold in a state of reversible suspended animation. These studies raise fascinating questions about what sets the timing of development and whether it is possible to pause life.

Mountain View: Human Biology
Apr
25
7:00 pm19:00

Mountain View: Human Biology

  • Molly Magees

From ancient DNA to the human sleep, you will learn a lot about your body at this event!

Drinks available for purchase. (Food will not be available.)

21+ event.

Meet our speakers:

Bringing the Iceman back to life

Rosa Fregel

Postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, Department of Genetics

An Iceman was discovered by two German hikers in 1991 in the Alps. The frozen mummy was found at the Ötztal Alps, and was later given the name of Ötzi. Although they thought Ötzi was a victim of a mountaineering accident, analysis of artifacts determined that he was in fact a 5,300-year-old Iceman from the Copper Age! Numerous scientists have studied Ötzi’s cause of death, clothing, tools and, of course, his DNA! In this talk, we will see how science is able to know all about Ötzi the Iceman.

 

Why Sleep?

Rafael Pelayo

Clinical professor at Stanford center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

We will discuss what is known about why we sleep and dream. This talk will inform you  about the common sleep problems and disorders and how to fix them.

San Francisco: Eureka! Science Comedy
Apr
25
7:30 pm19:30

San Francisco: Eureka! Science Comedy

  • Piano Fight

Eureka! is an interactive science comedy show where scientists talk, comedians crack jokes, and audience members win fun, silly prizes. 

 

All the information and tickets will be available soon.

Redwood City: Shrooms and Alcohol
Apr
26
7:00 pm19:00

Redwood City: Shrooms and Alcohol

  • Freewheel Brewing

We will build things with mushrooms, learn about a 5000-year-old beer recipe and hear our singing scientists -The Ten thousand Ways, all this while sipping Freewheel's beer!

Food and drinks available for purchase. 21+ event 

Mycelium Materials: The Future is Fungal

Anja Scholze

Experience developer and program manager at the Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose

Biomaterials are rapidly growing in diversity, utility, and impact. One fascinating area of innovation is in using fungus mycelium to grow incredible new materials with unique and amazing properties. Companies and researchers are growing furniture, building materials, leather and styrofoam replacements, and more. How does this work? Why is it so cool? What are the benefits and future implications? Can I do this at home? Come learn about (and touch) living mushroom materials.

Recreating a 5000-year-old Chinese beer receipe

Jiajing Wang

Graduate Student at Stanford University

In this talk she will introduce a recipe for a 5000-year-old beer she recently discovered in China. She applies starch, phytolith and chemical analysis in this research.

It's the End of The World as We Know It

The Ten Thousand Ways (Greg Bentsen and Trisha Stan)

They make depressing facts about the end of the world more hilarious by telling you about the science and then singing about it. Learn how the world may (or may not) end, and if there's anything to do about it besides drowning your sorrows in delicious Freewheel Brewing Company beverages.

San Francisco: Neurosciences: Biology and Gene Editing
Apr
26
8:00 pm20:00

San Francisco: Neurosciences: Biology and Gene Editing

  • Piano Fight

PianoFight hosts Ashley Libby to discuss gene editing, and Georgia Panagiotakos to discuss the brain and neuron development.

Tickets will be available soon

Gene Editing: Approaching the age of GATTACA

Ashley Libby

Graduate Student at Gladstone Institute

Our DNA controls our lives more than we realize. It not only influences appearance and body function, but it can also cause things to go wrong. Many diseases are genetically linked to your DNA. Now imagine being able to change that. While this might seem like science fiction, it is closer to reality with the discovery of a gene-editing tool called CRISPR. What is CRISPR? Why are scientists excited about it? Come learn about the developing field of gene editing, and what we should watch out for.

Building a brain: how neurons arise during development

Georgia Panagiotakos

Junior Faculty - Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research

I will give a broad overview of the different types of research being done in the field of brain development. I will also describe my lab’s specific area of interest, which is understanding how electrical signals in the embryonic brain regulate the development of specific types of neurons. Defects in this process have been associated with developmental disorders like autism.

Palo Alto: Climate change
Apr
27
7:00 pm19:00

Palo Alto: Climate change

  • Scotty's Bar

Come and learn some facts about climate change from the expert- Katharine Mach. See a live demo of how climate change is affecting marine life by Lorraine Ling. 

Food and drinks available for purchase. 21+ event

Climate change 2017 – the risks and the options

Katharine Mach

Senior Research Scientist at Stanford University, Director of Stanford Environment Assessment Facility

Over decades, assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and many others has bolstered understanding of the climate problem: unequivocal warming, pervasive impacts, and serious risks from continued high emissions of heat-trapping gases. Societies are increasingly responding with early efforts to decarbonize energy systems and prepare for impacts. I'll recap the current state of knowledge and action.

Information about the second speaker is soming soon.

San Francisco: Climate Change
Apr
27
7:30 pm19:30

San Francisco: Climate Change

  • The Purple Onion at Kell’s

Priya Shukla and Yogi Hendlin will present the effects of Climate Change on our planet, and Tom MCFadden will lighten the mood with a spectacular science rap performance at The Purple Onion at Kell’s.

Seeking Solutions in a Sea of Change

   

Priya Shukla

Ocean Acidification Technician - Bodega Ocean Acidification Research (BOAR) - UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory

A series of vignettes about the different ways climate change is impacting our oceans and on-going research along the California coast to better understand and help mitigate some of them using mussels, seagrasses, and abalones.

Science Rapping

   

Tom McFadden

Middle school science teacher by day, and a SCIENCE RAPPER by night

Tom works with his students to make epic music videos about scientific stories. Come see him perform some of his biggest hits.

The effects of pollution on organism signaling and human health

Yogi Hale Hendlin

Environmental Philosopher and Political Theorist - UCSF Department of Medicine

While environmental conservation is typically framed in terms of ensuring a livable future planet for humans, less frequently invoked but equally pertinent is the way in which anthropogenic environmental disruptions cripple the abilities of species to navigate and make sense of their habitat. The nascent science of biosemiotics—the semiotics of nonhuman organisms—focuses on how organisms make meaning from their environmental stimuli and the signals of conspecifics as well as interspecifics.