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Changing Communication: A Scientific Perspective

  • DSK 710 Fulton Street Brooklyn, NY, 11217 United States (map)

From ancient wall paintings in South America to instant access posts on Twitter, communication has constantly been evolving. As we think about how art, writing, and speech have changed over time, it’s important to note the external forces that have drastically transformed how we communicate with each other. Hear from an archaeologist, linguistic anthropologist, and social media manager as we dig into communication, from the disturbance of ancient art by a changing climate to the effect of modern technology on our communities and networks.

NOTE: This event is 21+

  Dr. Jena Barchas-Lichtenstein   You say to-MAY-to, I say to-MAH-to: making sense of the world through language  Why do we have so many different ways of saying the same thing, anyway? Linguistic anthropology is the study of how people make sense of the world through language. You might think we mostly use language for reference — to talk  about  people, places, and things — but that's just one of language's most important functions. Language also helps us form and display identities, locate each other in social hierarchies, and way more. 

Dr. Jena Barchas-Lichtenstein

You say to-MAY-to, I say to-MAH-to: making sense of the world through language

Why do we have so many different ways of saying the same thing, anyway? Linguistic anthropology is the study of how people make sense of the world through language. You might think we mostly use language for reference — to talk about people, places, and things — but that's just one of language's most important functions. Language also helps us form and display identities, locate each other in social hierarchies, and way more. 

  Karen Holmberg   I have just returned from fieldwork in Patagonia, where I am examining a rock art cave under a volcano. Its ceilings are covered in spiders, floors in shells, and walls with vulvas. The remains of a child were found in a back room. Clearly, something was going on, but what? I put this new work and data in context with historical geological debates, my own NASA lineage, and contemporary climate change anxieties to query what the past can or should contribute to understandings of the future.

Karen Holmberg

I have just returned from fieldwork in Patagonia, where I am examining a rock art cave under a volcano. Its ceilings are covered in spiders, floors in shells, and walls with vulvas. The remains of a child were found in a back room. Clearly, something was going on, but what? I put this new work and data in context with historical geological debates, my own NASA lineage, and contemporary climate change anxieties to query what the past can or should contribute to understandings of the future.

  Chloe Politis   Social Media in Research  Social Media has transformed the way people connect with one another. Discover the impact of social media on healthcare, medicine, and research.

Chloe Politis

Social Media in Research

Social Media has transformed the way people connect with one another. Discover the impact of social media on healthcare, medicine, and research.

Earlier Event: April 22
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Later Event: April 24
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