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Climate Change: How We Know

  • Ryan's Daughter 350 East 84th Street New York, NY, 10028 United States (map)

Scientists have been predicting climate change impacts with extraordinary accuracy for decades, even as fossil fuel interests have attacked and tried to undermine them. How do they get it so right? Speakers will explain the models, satellites, marine robots, and millennia worth of soil, ice and tree ring samples that are illuminating our dangerous path ahead — and that helped win the United Nations' climate science program a Nobel Peace Prize.

This event is 21+

 This event is in partnership with Climate Central.  Learn more about Climate Central here!

This event is in partnership with Climate Central. Learn more about Climate Central here!

  John Upton   John Upton is a features journalist at Climate Central, which researches and reports on the changing climate. He has science and business degrees and more than a decade of international reporting experience. Guided by science and by extensive field reporting, he tells stories about climate change's impacts and solutions.

John Upton

John Upton is a features journalist at Climate Central, which researches and reports on the changing climate. He has science and business degrees and more than a decade of international reporting experience. Guided by science and by extensive field reporting, he tells stories about climate change's impacts and solutions.

  Maureen E. Raymo   How do we know climate change is real? How do we know if what is happening is caused by human activities? What is going to happen in the future? Will it impact me? What should I do? What can I do?

Maureen E. Raymo

How do we know climate change is real? How do we know if what is happening is caused by human activities? What is going to happen in the future? Will it impact me? What should I do? What can I do?

  Sarah Kapnick   Learn how climate scientists use models run on super computers and observations to understand our world with Sarah Kapnick, a hydroclimate scientist at NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Her team uses these tools to project climate impacts and to evaluate climate change's role in extreme weather events.

Sarah Kapnick

Learn how climate scientists use models run on super computers and observations to understand our world with Sarah Kapnick, a hydroclimate scientist at NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Her team uses these tools to project climate impacts and to evaluate climate change's role in extreme weather events.