Music on the Brain

  • Ryan's Daughter 350 East 85th Street New York, NY, 10028 United States

SOLD OUT! WAIT LIST TICKETS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR!

If you listen to music and are fascinated by how it affects human memory, emotion, and health, then this event is for you (this should be everybody)! Come and learn about the expansive field of music cognition from New York University postdoctoral researchers Amy Belfi (NYU), who will speak about musical memory and naming, and Pablo Ripollés Vidal (NYU), who will discuss the role of music in recovery of stroke patients, while also tempering our overwhelming excitement on music and neuroscience with some caution and skepticism. Join us for some music, science, beer, and a game of ‘Name That Tune’ featuring prizes- so start listening!

Following our event will be the regular Thursday night jazz at Ryan's Daughter from 9:30-11:30. This jazz duo features jazz guitarist Gene Bertoncini and double bassist Josh Marcum, with special guests coming in and out throughout the night. All Music on the Brain attendees are invited to stay and enjoy!

Pablo Ripollés - Play it again, Sam Music affects our motivation, our mood, even our memory. Neuroimaging studies confirm that music stimulates widespread areas in the brain—including auditory, motor and reward-related regions. But, what can science say about the real effects that music has on the human brain? Does music promote brain plasticity? Can music play a role in health care? Should we remain skeptical? Here, I will talk—half excited, half skeptic—about music, reward and brain plasticity, with a focus on stroke patients.

Pablo Ripollés - Play it again, Sam

Music affects our motivation, our mood, even our memory. Neuroimaging studies confirm that music stimulates widespread areas in the brain—including auditory, motor and reward-related regions. But, what can science say about the real effects that music has on the human brain? Does music promote brain plasticity? Can music play a role in health care? Should we remain skeptical? Here, I will talk—half excited, half skeptic—about music, reward and brain plasticity, with a focus on stroke patients.

Amy Belfi - Music and the brain: Understanding the listener experience Music is a ubiquitous part of the human experience. While it was once thought of as ‘auditory cheesecake,’ we now know that music influences, and can help us understand, diverse cognitive functions such as language, memory, emotion, and decision-making. In my research, I examine how music affects us by studying its relationship with these cognitive domains. Here, I will discuss research on how we make judgments about music and why listening to music induces strong emotions and vivid memories.

Amy Belfi - Music and the brain: Understanding the listener experience

Music is a ubiquitous part of the human experience. While it was once thought of as ‘auditory cheesecake,’ we now know that music influences, and can help us understand, diverse cognitive functions such as language, memory, emotion, and decision-making. In my research, I examine how music affects us by studying its relationship with these cognitive domains. Here, I will discuss research on how we make judgments about music and why listening to music induces strong emotions and vivid memories.