Is it all in the genes?
Apr
26
7:00 PM19:00

Is it all in the genes?

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John Novembre, PhD
University of Chicago
@jnovembre

Genes and geography in humans
Modern tools for DNA sequencing are allowing the rapid accumulation of large data sets with observations of human genetic variation. How can we visualize the underlying patterns in such large-scale data? What do these patterns teach us about our history as a species on this planet? In this talk, we’ll explore answers to these questions and improve our understanding of evolutionary processes that shape both human adaptations, disease, and personalized ancestry. 

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Darrel Waggoner, MD
University of Chicago

Your genes' impact on your medical care: myths and reality
Genetic testing seems to be the future, but how much can we actually determine and what is used in today's hospitals? We will talk about how genetic information is transforming diagnostics and clinical care, as well as address some of the myths surrounding genetic testing.


Event information:

  • This event is open to all ages
  • Drinks and food will be available for purchase
  • In the event of any last-minute event cancellations, we will post an announcement on our TOS Chicago webpage, Facebook, and Twitter
  • If you are interested in volunteering for any of our events, please email us at chicago@tasteofscience.org
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Getting wired: restoring movement and sensation through a brain-computer interface
Apr
25
7:00 PM19:00

Getting wired: restoring movement and sensation through a brain-computer interface

 Sliman Bensmaia is an Associate Professor in the Dept of Organismal Biology and Anatomy at the University of Chicago.

Sliman Bensmaia is an Associate Professor in the Dept of Organismal Biology and Anatomy at the University of Chicago.

Sliman Bensmaia, PhD
University of Chicago
@slimanjbensmaia

Biological and bionic hands: Natural neural coding and artificial perception
Our ability to manipulate objects dexterously relies fundamentally on sensory signals originating from the hand. To restore motor function with upper-limb neuroprostheses requires that somatosensory feedback be provided to the tetraplegic patient or amputee. To this end, we develop approaches to intuitively convey sensory information that is critical for object manipulation through electrical stimulation of the sensory areas of the brain.


 Lee E. Miller is a Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience at Northwestern University and president of the Society for the Neural Control of Movement

Lee E. Miller is a Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience at Northwestern University and president of the Society for the Neural Control of Movement

Lee Miller, PhD
Northwestern University
@PresNCM

We zap the body electric: Restoring movement following paralysis with brain-controlled functional electrical stimulation
Spinal cord injury is devastating, and there is currently no real treatment. Ultimately we’d want to regrow the spinal cord, but in the meantime, it is now possible to literally reconnect the brain and muscles electronically. I will describe experiments in which we eavesdrop directly on signals in a monkey’s brain, translate them into appropriate control signals, and send them to an electrical stimulator that causes muscles to contract, thereby allowing voluntary control of paralyzed muscles.

 


Event information:

  • This event is open to all ages
  • Drinks and food will be available for purchase
  • In the event of any last-minute event cancellations, we will post an announcement on our TOS Chicago webpage, Facebook, and Twitter
  • If you are interested in volunteering for any of our events, please email us at chicago@tasteofscience.org
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The Earth's energy and climate futures
Apr
24
7:00 PM19:00

The Earth's energy and climate futures

 Liz Moyer is an Associate Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Chicago in the Dept of Geophysical Sciences.

Liz Moyer is an Associate Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Chicago in the Dept of Geophysical Sciences.

Liz Moyer, PhD
University of Chicago

Energy is the foundation of the human economy, but our energy system is now so large that its waste product, CO2, can alter global climate. We’ll discuss the scale of humanity’s activities, their physical effects, and possible energy technologies of the future.  One goal is to provide simple physical frameworks and back-of-the-envelope calculations that can lead to core insights (for example, that biofuels cannot be a solution, or that CO2 tends to make climate less rather than more variable).


Event information:

  • This event is open to all ages
  • Drinks and food will be available for purchase
  • In the event of any last-minute event cancellations, we will post an announcement on our TOS Chicago webpage, Facebook, and Twitter
  • If you are interested in volunteering for any of our events, please email us at chicago@tasteofscience.org
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Invisible Influence: How microbes rule our lives
Apr
23
7:00 PM19:00

Invisible Influence: How microbes rule our lives

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Jack Gilbert, PhD
University of Chicago
@gilbertjacka

The human microbiome is quickly being recognized as a dynamic part of the human ecosystem, and research is starting to demonstrate that using ecology to understand this ecosystem has profound benefits for patient wellness. The immune system controls our interaction with the microbial world, and yet the microbial communities in our bodies are central to modulating the immune response. 

How is it that these unseen organisms living in and on our bodies affect our health, happiness, and day-to-day lives?


Event information:

  • This event is 21+ only
  • Drinks and food will be available for purchase ($1 tacos and half off all drafts!)
  • In the event of any last-minute event cancellations, we will post an announcement on our TOS Chicago webpage, Facebook, and Twitter
  • If you are interested in volunteering for any of our events, please email us at chicago@tasteofscience.org
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Innovating and engineering for and on the wards
Apr
22
6:00 PM18:00

Innovating and engineering for and on the wards

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Cristian Luciano, PhD
University of Illinois at Chicago

Haptics and Virtual Reality in Medicine: 4 case studies
The emerging technologies of virtual reality and haptics have the potential to improve medical training, enhance image-based diagnostics, and increase surgical outcomes. This talk will focus on the research and development of interactive applications for surgical training and simulation, non-invasive prostate cancer diagnosis, preoperative planning, and multi-sensorial surgical guidance, conducted by a multidisciplinary collaboration among engineers, physicians, and 3D modelers at UIC.

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Craig Niederberger, MD FACS
University of Illinois at Chicago
@Craigni

Zero Bar Innovation
We are in an era where creating highly sophisticated technological innovations that previously required substantial resources accessible to a few large industries are now available to all. This social sea change in the democratization of high technology has resulted in a zero bar for innovation with extraordinary ramifications for educating engineers and for public innovators. And sex and bicycles. Got your attention? 


Event information:

  • This event is open to all ages
  • Drinks and food will be available for purchase
  • In the event of any last-minute event cancellations, we will post an announcement on our TOS Chicago webpage, Facebook, and Twitter
  • If you are interested in volunteering for any of our events, please email us at chicago@tasteofscience.org
View Event →