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The Opposite of Manic Monday

  • The Casual Pint Hardin Valley 10677 Hardin Valley Road Knoxville, TN, 37931 United States (map)

Science can be far reaching, from the fjords of Norway to a classroom here in Knoxville. Join us tonight to hear from two University of Tennessee scientists sharing their love of science.  Doors will be open at 6:30pm. We will have food, drinks and chatting with our new friends until 7:00pm, when the action begins!

 

Timeline

6:30pm

Doors will be open at 6:30pm. There are numerous excellent food options in the Hardin Valley area so be sure to plan ahead and bring some tasty eats! Enjoy a bounty of drinks (both with and without alcohol) offered by the Casual Pint while chatting with new friends.

7:00-9:00pm

Following a brief introduction to taste of science and thanks to our sponsors, we will hear from our speakers with plenty of time between for questions and refills. 

FAQ

Seating is limited; only a limited number of tickets will be available for purchase at the door. 

Michael Camponovo, GIS Outreach Coordinator and Manager of the GIS Outreach and Engagement Laboratory in the Department of Geology at the University of Tennessee 

Michael Camponovo, GIS Outreach Coordinator and Manager of the GIS Outreach and Engagement Laboratory in the Department of Geology at the University of Tennessee 

Geography…More Than Maps

From drones to self-driving cars to predicting wildfires, geographers do more than make maps and memorize capitals. Join us for a tour of how UTK geographers are utilizing lidar (like radar but with 100% more lasers), unmanned drones, and tree rings to study erosion, build 3D models, and model the history of wildfire in the Great Smoky Mountains. We will be joined by Vine Magnet Middle School who will have their augmented reality sandbox on display and we’ll have a Microsoft HoloLens to try.

Jonelle Basso, PhD Candidate in Microbiology at the University of Tennessee

Jonelle Basso, PhD Candidate in Microbiology at the University of Tennessee

Viruses are abundant in the marine environment, where they actively infect marine bacteria and contribute to biogeochemical cycles. We study these bacteria because they are of ecological importance, and some organisms of this group of bacteria can populate up to 25% of all marine bacteria in some geographical locations, such as marshes. We care about the interactions of viruses with these marine bacteria because this affects the nutrients that become available for the base of the marine food chain...a food chain that we are a part. We also care because they can affect global cycling, for example, cycling of carbon. We also care because viruses could actually effect gene transfer to their hosts, which could bring them advantages. 

Earlier Event: April 24
Cure for the Monday Blues
Later Event: April 25
Lyme, Ticks and Science Oh My