Apr
27
4:00 PM16:00

The science of 3D printing

d94e7f738c94-IMG_0863.JPG

Dustin Gilmer

I work on Additive Manufacturing/ 3D-Printing and I am interested in printing new materials utilizing new chemistry and material science. I am a native of Kingsport TN and I flew for the first time last year.

Chemistry of Additive Manufacturing

Chemistry is all around us in our everyday lives. It is involved in what we eat, how we travel, and how we make just about everything. I work on the chemistry of making things specifically through Additive Manufacturing and how chemistry affects those objects.

 
4faede5b5fa1-Babu_MABE.jpg

Suresh Babu

I like to 3D print hybrid materials for challenging applications relevant to department of energy.

I like to work with people to learn and share and also pay it forward

Drink anything but little.

Paper wasps and 3D printing

What we can learn from nature related to additive manufacturing of hybrid materials for challenging environments.

View Event →
Apr
26
6:00 PM18:00

The science behind food safety myths, clean groundwater and electricity producing microbes

8503cca75f22-Hudson.jpg

Lauren Hudson

I am a postdoc researcher in the Food Science Dept. at UTIA and focus on genomics of food borne bacterial pathogens like Salmonella

I love cats, beer, and SEC football

Busting Food Safety Myths

There are many myths and common misconceptions about food safety. I plan to discuss a few of these and set the record straight.

 
a649397df6c4-Putt_portrait.jpeg

Andrew Putt

Current PhD student at UTK where I study the ultramicro- microbial dark matter found in contaminated aquifers as a means of investigating the fate and transport of contaminants and genetic material in groundwater systems.

Drink of Choice is a glass of wine (any kind) or coffee!

Cleaning Groundwater where size really does matter!

Ever scrubbed a stain from your carpet? Then you know how annoying spills can be. Unfortunately there is no magic stain stick for uranium and nitric acid spills that alter groundwater chemistry, biology, and flow patterns allowing them to persist for hundreds of years. However, this study of incredibly small ultramicrobacteria is shedding new light and understanding into how these highly active small cells may influence contaminant movement and be stimulated by the addition of nutrients.

 
874da100634b-headshot_Scott_Satinover.jpg

Scott Satinover

I study devices that turn trash into electricity. When I'm not doing research or talking about it, you can find me writing columns, practicing yoga, or drinking stouts.

One Man's Trash is Another Man's Treasure: Using Microbes to Make Energy

Much of the waste produced in this country has an incredible amount of untapped energy. We haven't really been able to harvest energy from a lot of them until recently. Now, scientists have realized they can use devices, known as bioelectrochemical systems, to convert these wastes into electricity, hydrogen, and chemicals. This talk will go over the history, fundamentals, and current status of these devices, outlining some of the problems currently being researched.

View Event →
Apr
25
6:00 PM18:00

The science behind flavor and milking robots

427423f76f13-1277802_519131104829770_1638335150_o.jpg

Bob Pellegrino

I focus on the physiology and perception of odors and measuring, diagnosing and understanding the impact of smell loss or impairment with an emphasis on food

My favorite drinks are gin-based and my favorite food is cheesy fries

Bringing Flavor Back to the Senses: Life with Olfactory Loss

As a dominant contributor to the flavor of food, the inability to smell removes many of the joys of cooking and eating. The quarter of the population who experience such loss are typically left in the dark with friends and family not fully understanding their hardship. This talk will shed light on life without smell while providing insight on the current research from medical practitioners in the field of chemical senses.

 
e3fa39febb07-Capture.JPG

Amanda Lee

Although I grew up as a city kid from Chicago, I spend my research days hanging out with cows. In my spare time I enjoy hanging out with my dogs and playing softball. Shockingly, my favorite foods are cheese and ice cream.

How many cows can a milking robot handle?

When there are more cows than physical space (overstocking), it can feel like you are at a shopping mall on Black Friday. Overstocking is stressful for cows and can lead to less milk, meaning less ice cream. Milking robots are a new technology that allows cows to be milked as frequently as they choose. When cows milk more frequently, they can produce more milk. So, our overall goal is to determine how overstocking effects cows' milk production when milked with a milking robot.

View Event →
Apr
23
6:00 PM18:00

The science behind magnets and GMOs

8f33176a82d3-WIN_20190410_17_09_56_Pro.jpg

Dustin Gilbert

I am interested in nanotechnology, computation of the future, magnetism and spin; I work with thin-films and nanostructures, using their small geometry to control their properties. I like to drink coffee, lots and lots of coffee, with cream and yellow-fake sugar.

Magnets and You

Magnetism affects your life every day - whether you know it or not. Research into magnetic materials, and specifically nanoscale magnetism, has improved the world tremendously over the recent 20 years, including enabling wind-power and electric cars, and treating cancer. In the future, magnetism will present a new frontier for computation through the development of spintronics. This talk will discuss the many ways magnetism has, and will continue to, impact our lives in revolutionary ways.

 
14a21479ca89-cma.jpg

Nannan Jiang

I am fascinated by the language of DNA!

How GMOs learn to read

If you are reading this, it means at some point you have learned to read. Some of us have even learned to read multiple languages. But how have we come to learn to read? Perhaps GMOs have the answer!

View Event →
Apr
22
6:30 PM18:30

The science behind beer and snakes

90c08db70ede-Trent.jpg

Trent Kerley

Graduate student in Food Science at the University of Tennessee. His research focus is the chemistry of whiskey aroma; his work on Tennessee whiskey was recently featured in Scientific American's 60 second science podcast. Other than whiskey, his favorite drink is a stout.

Beer: How'd that get in my glass?

Beer is one of the oldest and most popular drinks in the world. This talk will go into how beer is made and delve into what differentiates one style of beer from another.

 
a8a70e9e4652-IMG_9486.jpg

Andrew Moore

My background is biochemistry and microbiology but I am a trained amateur herpetologist who loves catching cold blooded critters

Snakes in Tennessee and their new deadly fungal disease

Snakes, as scary as they may seem, are amazing creatures. However, across the US, they have been infected with a deadly fungal disease. Last year, I spent time catching snakes to better understand this disease and look for a way to fight it. Though I also gathered microbial samples, I gathered a new appreciation for these special serpents!

View Event →
Apr
21
6:30 PM18:30

The science behind bone regeneration and the Zika virus

2010309b1ac1-672C052F_3270_44CC_8844_6AC20F8F6A51.JPG

Caroline Billings

I am working towards a DVM/PhD at the University of Tennessee. I'm about to start my clinical rotations for my veterinary program, which is exciting! As for research, my area of interest is Regenerative Medicine. In my non-science life, I love cute dogs, craft beer and instructing barre3 classes!

Bone Regeneration - the Future of Fracture Repair

This is some of the coolest research I have ever been involved with! The focus is on a biodegradable tissue regeneration device that is specialized to regenerate bone. This device has the potential to change lives of individuals that have serious bone injuries.

 
 Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

Rachael Wolters

Beer is my fuel of choice.

Answering micro questions about Zika virus & microcephaly

What does the World Cup, RNA, and sheep have in common? Learn why Zika virus pathogenesis can answer that question.

View Event →
Mar
14
6:30 PM18:30

March Event on nuclear materials & Summit Supercomputer

  • Elkmont Exchange Brewery & Eating House (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
22acfe12be0f-Beers_Brianne_profile_picture.png

Brianne Beers


Non-Destructive Characterization of Nuclear Materials

Nuclear power is a critical part of the global energy portfolio. It is important to characterize the materials used in a nuclear reactor including concrete, steel, and Zr alloys. These materials experience deformation during reactor operation. Research is performed using non-destructive techniques to understand how defects form. This allows scientists to analyze samples without causing further damage. Understanding nuclear material deformation is important for maintaining reactor safety.


 
e453de149014-2017_P06920_copy.jpeg

Bronson Messer

Using the World's Most Powerful Supercomputer to Blow Up Stars for Fun and Profit (well, fun anyway...)

Summit, at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computer Facility, is the most powerful computer ever built by humans. Some of the most computationally intensive tasks undertaken on the machine are supernova simulations. I will describe how computational scientists really use Summit to learn how massive stars die, form neutron stars and black holes, ripple spacetime with gravitational waves, and form the elements that make us... us.



View Event →
Friday Fun Day
Apr
27
7:00 PM19:00

Friday Fun Day

After an exciting week of talks, come join us for the final two of the week! This event even has some hands on, interactive sandboxes and electronics to play with if that's something you enjoy. Join us at Bearden Beer Market as we wrap up the festival, and say thank you to everyone that participated and helped make this year happen.

View Event →
Quench Your Knowledge Thursday
Apr
26
7:00 PM19:00

Quench Your Knowledge Thursday

377dcfcafb07-Rafting (1).jpg

There is an "I" in Excercise

Kelley Strohacker

Exercise: we've all heard the sayings "no pain, no gain", or "just exercise and you'll feel better when you're done". These sayings ignore that, across time, we experience shifts in our mental and physical states and these shifts matter when choosing between a workout and a Netflix binge. My talk will explain why we should care about how we feel before and during exercise. It will also explore how a more flexible, participant-responsive exercise program may help people achieve their goals.

 
e4aaf218b159-Rascal_Pic (3).jpg

Mining Water on Mars

RASC-ALs at UTK

We will discuss the basics of the competition, the difficulties of designing for space missions, our current design, and lessons learned from the competition last year. Learn how humans may one day get water on Mars!

 
b85c71069b5e-Dave.jpg

Extraction of Yttrium for Electronics

Dave DeSimone

If you've ever shaken a bottle of salad dressing and watched it slowly separate, then you'd understand the process of solvent extraction. We mix a water phase with an oil phase to extract trace amounts of metal (yttrium) from the water phase into the oil phase. The yttrium is a valuable metal that has uses in electronics. 

 
View Event →
Story Time for Mushrooms and Plastics
Apr
24
7:00 PM19:00

Story Time for Mushrooms and Plastics

One of these is natural and from the Earth, the other is mostly man-made, they both encompass the globe.

Night three of our festival will feature two stories: one about the use of mushrooms in medical uses and their abilities, while the other is a story of how plastics became so popular and revolutionary in the past century.

View Event →
Rock Your Socks Off
Apr
23
7:00 PM19:00

Rock Your Socks Off

f822781a3f6d-Churup_Crop.jpg

Using Isotope Chemistry to Unravel the History of North America

Tyler Grambling

The core of the North American continent is over 2.5 billion years old, the bulk of it is over 1.5 billion years old. Deciphering how we got from a series of islands to the 3rd largest landmass on Earth takes a cue from zircon--a minor contributor to most silica-rich rocks, but a major player in Earth history. By examining the ratios of certain isotopes in zircon and applying them to the rock record, we can break down the sequence of events that built the ground under our feet

 
b59c7b3e9c9d-2016_P07165__1_.jpg

Role of Nano-materials in the Future of Electronics

Akinola Oyedele

The electronic devices we use today are getting smarter, more efficient and smaller. My talk will focus on the role a new class of material, two-dimensional materials like graphene, will play in revolutionizing the future of nano-electronics. Specifically, I will highlight my recent work on novel 2D palladium diselenide, with unique pentagonal atomic structure, which possesses wide tunable electronic properties and high carrier mobility needed for device applications. 

 
View Event →
taste of science Kick Off!
Apr
22
4:00 PM16:00

taste of science Kick Off!

Space! The final frontier

What will it take to get humans there permanently? Where can we go? What can we expect to find? Come join us Sunday afternoon to discuss what tools we need to get water on Mars for colonization and what stress will do to the body.

View Event →
Mid-Week Science Hump
Apr
26
6:30 PM18:30

Mid-Week Science Hump

Climate science and nuclear energy are both news hot topics. But is what you hear in the news relevant to the research? Join us tonight to hear from two local scientists as they share their research!Doors will be open at 6:30 PM. We will have food, drinks and chatting with our new friends until 7, when the action begins!

View Event →
Lyme, Ticks and Science Oh My
Apr
25
6:30 PM18:30

Lyme, Ticks and Science Oh My

Every day can be an adventure, particularly when you live in the blood-sucking south! Join us tonight as we hear from a University of Tennessee scientist discussing the villians of the Southern wilderness. Doors will be open at 6:30 PM. We will have food, drinks and chatting with our new friends until 7, when the action begins! 

View Event →
Cure for the Monday Blues
Apr
24
6:30 PM18:30

Cure for the Monday Blues

Are you reading this on your computer or phone? How much battery do you have right now? As we move into the future, how we do find new ways of harnessing and storing energy? Join us tonight to hear from two University of Tennessee scientists researching energy. Doors will be open at 6:30 PM. We will have food, drinks and chatting with our new friends until 7, when the action begins! 

View Event →
2017 Festival Kickoff: A Science Smorgasbord
Apr
23
1:00 PM13:00

2017 Festival Kickoff: A Science Smorgasbord

Join us as we kickoff our second amazing year of science here in Knoxville with talks from local ORNL and UTK scientists and a medical physicist from Provision Proton Therapy! As a special treat, this year's kickoff will be a super event with 4 speakers! But not to worry, we will leave plenty of room between for chats with friends, food and drink refills, and exciting discussions about science. 

View Event →