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Sweet Sweet Science

  • Sugar Mama's 135 South Gay Street Knoxville, TN, 37902 United States (map)

Science can be so sweet, especially when you enjoy it with tasty treats! Join us tonight as we hear from University of Tennessee scientists discussing the fascinating uses of 3d printing technology and tiny bog turtles. 

Timeline

6:30PM.

Doors will be open at 6:30pm. There are numerous excellent food options at Sugar Mama's and the surrounding downtown Knoxville area to grab some tasty eats! Enjoy a bounty of drinks (both with and without alcohol) while chatting with new friends.

7:00-9:00PM

Following a brief introduction to taste of science and thanks to our sponsors, we will hear from our speakers with plenty of time between for questions and refills.  

FAQ

Seating is limited; only a limited number of tickets will be available for purchase at the door. 

Alex Pawlowski, University of Tennessee Bredesen Center graduate student in Transportation Science and 3d printing team leader

Alex Pawlowski, University of Tennessee Bredesen Center graduate student in Transportation Science and 3d printing team leader

Navigating the seas of relevance in 3d printing

Cars. Tools. Buildings. An excavator. If you can think of it, someone has probably printed it. You might have read about some of these as a headline or downloaded a model from Thingiverse. But what are some of the implications of these demos? When's printed X available to purchse at Y? Is it viable to print? How will industry Z or society A benefit? Alex will share his journey so far in traversing the context in which 3d printing can apply to even a cost-adverse industry like transportation.

Cassie Dresser, PhD Student in the College of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee

Cassie Dresser, PhD Student in the College of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee

A Tiny Turtle Tale: Conserving North America's Smallest Turtle

 

The bog turtle (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) is one of the rarest turtles in North America. This habitat specialist was added to the Endangered Species List in 1997. I will share some of our Species Recovery Plan objectives and how we have addressed them thus far (genetic assessment of wild populations, genetic consequences of translocations, and how to develop an effective education program). You might also hear some entertaining stories about my field work to boot!

Earlier Event: April 26
Mid-Week Science Hump
Later Event: April 27
Do You Smell That?