Back to All Events

The Birds and the Parasitic Wasps

  • Ryan's Daughter 350 East 85th Street New York, NY, 10028 United States (map)

Join taste of science as we dive into a non-traditional interpretation of the birds and the bees! We will be exploring how communication evolves between baby birds and their parents and digging into how parasitic wasps take over their hosts’ bodies.

This event is 21+

Dr. Shana Caro, Simons Foundation Junior Fellow, based at Columbia University Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology   Is a baby bird trustworthy? And why should we care? I'll be exploring how honest communication can evolve between individuals with conflicting interests, like baby birds and their parents.

Dr. Shana Caro, Simons Foundation Junior Fellow, based at Columbia University Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology

Is a baby bird trustworthy? And why should we care? I'll be exploring how honest communication can evolve between individuals with conflicting interests, like baby birds and their parents.

Dr. Carly Tribull, SUNY Farmingdale Department of Biology   Feasting on their host’s bodies, parasitoid wasps seem more like monsters out of science fiction than fairly common predators of the insect world. They have long fascinated entomologists and evolutionary biologists, and have captivated the public with both their gross-factor and usefulness in protecting our food crops from plant-eating pests. In this brief chat, learn about the diversity of these wasps and their hungry, hungry larvae (sorry, caterpillars). The presenter, Dr. Carly Tribull, is an entomologist at Farmingdale State College (SUNY), graduate of the American Museum of Natural History, and is a big fan of insects that make their business bursting out of other insects.

Dr. Carly Tribull, SUNY Farmingdale Department of Biology

Feasting on their host’s bodies, parasitoid wasps seem more like monsters out of science fiction than fairly common predators of the insect world. They have long fascinated entomologists and evolutionary biologists, and have captivated the public with both their gross-factor and usefulness in protecting our food crops from plant-eating pests. In this brief chat, learn about the diversity of these wasps and their hungry, hungry larvae (sorry, caterpillars). The presenter, Dr. Carly Tribull, is an entomologist at Farmingdale State College (SUNY), graduate of the American Museum of Natural History, and is a big fan of insects that make their business bursting out of other insects.

Earlier Event: January 15
Big Human Data