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Animal-Microbe Symbiosis: Glow-in-the-Dark & Chewin' the Bark

  • Ryan's Daughter 350 East 84th Street New York, NY, 10028 United States (map)

Termites eat wood, and wood contains cellulose. The problem? Termites can’t naturally digest cellulose. Hawaiian bobtail squid glow in the dark, allowing them to hide from predators in patches of moonlight. The problem? Squid can’t naturally glow in the dark. How do these animals accomplish such impossible feats? By playing host to friendly microorganisms that allow them to go beyond their biology. Like termites and squids, our bodies have billions of bacteria that help us carry out essential processes that we can’t perform ourselves. Come learn about symbiosis, in which animals and microbes help each other out — while sipping some microorganism-fermented beer.

This event is 21+

  Sarah McAnulty   Say hello to my little friend: Beneficial relationships between bacteria and squid  Sarah McAnulty is a squid biologist at UConn studying how bobtail squid and their beneficial bioluminescent bacteria communicate!

Sarah McAnulty

Say hello to my little friend: Beneficial relationships between bacteria and squid

Sarah McAnulty is a squid biologist at UConn studying how bobtail squid and their beneficial bioluminescent bacteria communicate!

Earlier Event: April 24
Know Science: Mindfulness and Love
Later Event: April 26
Climate Change: How We Know