Science After Hours
Mar
26
7:00 PM19:00

Science After Hours

Join taste of science at the Franklin Institute for science after hours Tuesday, March 26th! The theme of the night is speakeasy and we will be performing a fruity experiment to isolate strawberry DNA using a refreshing cocktail (hint: we can’t skimp on the alcohol because it’s required for DNA precipitation!). Come experience getting buzzy with DNA.

View Event →
Gene Editing to Martian Weather
Apr
23
6:30 PM18:30

Gene Editing to Martian Weather

Meet the Speakers

Dr. Allison Songstad is a stem cell biologist and work for NanoString Technologies as a field applications scientist. I am also a big music nerd - as you will find out!

Dr. Allison Songstad is a stem cell biologist and work for NanoString Technologies as a field applications scientist. I am also a big music nerd - as you will find out!

CRISPR Genome Editing: The Musical

This great talk will be all about CRISPR, from its history to how it’s a winner. But there’s a twist! The whole time will be spent in song or in rhyme. CRISPR genome editing took the field by storm, infiltrated labs making the field transform. Adding to the science we loved it, we were grinning. We saw its brilliance and the field is now winning. There’s a lot more in store for all who like beer and are science-y.

 
Dr. David Klassen is a planetary scientist researching how clouds affect the water cycle and climate of Mars. I teach math methods and stellar astrophysics classes.

Dr. David Klassen is a planetary scientist researching how clouds affect the water cycle and climate of Mars. I teach math methods and stellar astrophysics classes.

How Do You Measure Clouds on Mars to inform Climate Models?

One of the major open areas of climate modeling is the net effect of clouds. Clouds are very good at moving energy around and affect local temperatures—during the day they make it cooler but at night they make it warmer.

The work I do uses images created from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and sophisticated math to locate and measure the amount of water in martian clouds over an entire martian year.

 
Originally from London, England, I spend my life trying to understand gravity—what is it? How it works? And why? As a theoretical physicist, my tools for answering these questions are simply pens, paper, and coffee.

Originally from London, England, I spend my life trying to understand gravity—what is it? How it works? And why? As a theoretical physicist, my tools for answering these questions are simply pens, paper, and coffee.

Gravitational Waves: A New Window to the Universe

Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of space-time. They originate from the most extreme events in the cosmos—black holes merging, stars colliding, and the Universe when it was less than a nanosecond old.

I will tell you what they are, how we measure them, and what we can learn by studying them. I will show you some of the amazing new discoveries we have already made, and the amazing things we are going to learn in the future.

Expect lots of movies and cool animations!

View Event →

Our Complex Brains
Apr
25
6:30 PM18:30

Our Complex Brains

Our final night will highlight complex processes regulated by our brains. First, we will learn about a novel technique, optogenetics, which uses light to control cells and how this has potential to cure diseases like chronic pain. Concussions, an underestimated epidemic, will be addressed from all angles including symptoms, sex differences, and what to do about them. Also, we will learn how climate change affects our genetics, all the way up to influencing our behaviors. Finally, we will wrap up our last night looking at how dopamine affects HIV infection.

View Event →
Surveying the ocean floor, exploring influenza, and snow melting concrete!
Apr
24
6:30 PM18:30

Surveying the ocean floor, exploring influenza, and snow melting concrete!

Come learn about how oceanographers explore the bottom of the ocean and what it's like to live on a research vessel. Next, understand why flu vaccines are not perfect but are still important to receive each year. Then you will be guided through the design and development of snow melting concrete from an engineering perspective.

View Event →
Macro to microenvironments: From planets to microbes and molecules
Apr
23
6:30 PM18:30

Macro to microenvironments: From planets to microbes and molecules

Environments have a large impact on our everyday lives, even if we don't realize it. We also shape the environments around us, be it locally or globally, or on a macro or micro level. For our opening night, scientists will discuss research on changing water patterns in Mongolia, how infectious diseases spread, body odor as a meter to detect idenity and health, and the microbiome! Come out and learn about these diverse enviroments!

View Event →
Drones, dinosaurs, and more!
Apr
25
6:00 PM18:00

Drones, dinosaurs, and more!

Curious about science, but not sure where to start? On this night, we will feature a smorgasbord of talks ranging from the history of dinosaurs, tiny drones, and how we talk to computers, to how to harness the power of a specific type of cell for treatment in nervous system injury. 

View Event →
Exploring galaxies near and far...
Apr
24
6:00 PM18:00

Exploring galaxies near and far...

Want to kick back, have a beer, and ponder what it all means? For our opening night, we will tackle questions about the cosmos, and hear from two speakers who will explore issues like whether the universe is expanding and how galaxies are formed. Then, we'll bring it back home to our own backyard, and learn about the changing face of our neighborhoods right here in Philadelphia. 

View Event →